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Ann Plast Surg. 2015 Sep;75(3):261-5. doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000000075.

L-Shaped Lipothighplasty.

Author information

1
From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In addition to the already-known postoperative complications in patients formerly obese, for medial thigh lift, there are many more problematic issues. The main ones are represented as follows: by the frequent downward displacement of the scars that become, in this way, extremely visible; by the distortion of the vulva or scrotal region; by serious and disabling disorders of the lymphatic system; and by the early recurrence of ptosis in this anatomical site.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

From 2004 to 2010, 16 patients with moderate to severe laxity of the medial area of the thighs were treated by an L-shaped medial thigh lift after selective liposuction. Ten have been previously treated with biliopancreatic diversion and 6 have been previously treated with gastric bypass. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) height before bariatric surgery was 1.62 (0.08) m, mean (SD) weight was 141.53 (23.12) kg, and mean (SD) body mass index was 57.13 (8.21) kg/m. After the intervention, mean (SD) weight decreased to 81.12 (16.43) kg, whereas mean (SD) body mass index decreased to 31.83 (8.51) kg/m.

RESULTS:

After L-shaped lipothighplasty, 13 patients (81%) had no complications in the postoperative period. No skin necrosis, hematoma, seroma, or thromboembolic events were reported. Two patients experienced hypertophic scarring and 1 patient had a wound infection because of poor hygienic care.

CONCLUSIONS:

The medial lifting technique defined as L-shaped lipothighplasty is a valid, fast, and safe technique and can reduce early and late postoperative complications in a critical and troublesome area for the surgeon who is going to correct the deformity.

PMID:
24374390
DOI:
10.1097/SAP.0000000000000075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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