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Mech Ageing Dev. 2014 Mar-Apr;136-137:85-93. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2013.12.005. Epub 2013 Dec 27.

Effect of resistance-type exercise training with or without protein supplementation on cognitive functioning in frail and pre-frail elderly: secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Author information

1
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Ondine.vandeRest@wur.nl.
2
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands; Top Institute Food and Nutrition, P.O. Box 557, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Human Movement Sciences, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
5
Communication Strategies; Communication, Technology and Philosophy - Centre for Integrative Development (CTP-CID), Social Sciences, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW Wageningen, The Netherlands; Manager Research Nutrition and Health, Dutch Dairy Association (NZO), P.O. Box 165, 2700 AD Zoetermeer, The Netherlands.
6
Top Institute Food and Nutrition, P.O. Box 557, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Human Movement Sciences, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Physical activity has been proposed as one of the most effective strategies to prevent cognitive decline. Protein supplementation may exert an additive effect. The effect of resistance-type exercise training with or without protein supplementation on cognitive functioning in frail and pre-frail elderly people was assessed in a secondary analysis. Two 24-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention studies were carried out in parallel. Subjects performed a resistance-type exercise program of two sessions per week (n=62) or no exercise program (n=65). In both studies, subjects were randomly allocated to either a protein (2×15 g daily) or a placebo drink. Cognitive functioning was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery focusing on the cognitive domains episodic memory, attention and working memory, information processing speed, and executive functioning. In frail and pre-frail elderly, resistance-type exercise training in combination with protein supplementation improved information processing speed (changes in domain score 0.08±0.51 versus -0.23±0.19 in the non-exercise group, p=0.04). Exercise training without protein supplementation was beneficial for attention and working memory (changes in domain scores 0.35±0.70 versus -0.12±0.69 in the non-exercise group, p=0.02). There were no significant differences among the intervention groups on the other cognitive tests or domain scores.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01109628 NCT01110369.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Cognitive functioning; Exercise training; Frailty; Protein supplementation

PMID:
24374288
DOI:
10.1016/j.mad.2013.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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