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J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Feb 12;151(3):1031-1039. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2013.11.040. Epub 2013 Dec 25.

Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine and Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine and Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC.
3
Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.
4
Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.
5
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine and Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Division of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC. Electronic address: dechwu@yahoo.com.
6
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC. Electronic address: ycwang@nchu.edu.tw.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring.

RESULTS:

Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils.

CONCLUSIONS:

Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity.

KEYWORDS:

4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone; Anti-inflammation; Histological observation; Sydney system

PMID:
24374236
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2013.11.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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