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Waste Manag. 2014 Oct;34(10):1752-62. doi: 10.1016/j.wasman.2013.11.014. Epub 2013 Dec 25.

Review of Italian experience on automotive shredder residue characterization and management.

Author information

1
Dept. of Civil, Building and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), University of Padova, Lungargine Rovetta 8, 35127 Padova, Italy.
2
Dept of Land, Environment and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy. Electronic address: silvia.fiore@polito.it.
3
ENEA Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, RC Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome, Italy.
4
Dept. of Industrial Engineering (DII), University of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, I-95125 Catania, Italy.
5
Dept of Land, Environment and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy.
6
Dept. of Civil, Building and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, I-00184 Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) is a special waste that can be classified as either hazardous or non hazardous depending on the amount of hazardous substances and on the features of leachate gathered from EN12457/2 test. However both the strict regulation concerning landfills and the EU targets related to End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) recovery and recycling rate to achieve by 2015 (Directive 2000/53/EC), will limit current landfilling practice and will impose an increased efficiency of ELVs valorization. The present paper considers ELVs context in Italy, taking into account ASRs physical-chemical features and current processing practice, focusing on the enhancement of secondary materials recovery. The application in waste-to-energy plants, cement kilns or metallurgical processes is also analyzed, with a particular attention to the possible connected environmental impacts. Pyrolysis and gasification are considered as emerging technologies although the only use of ASR is debatable; its mixing with other waste streams is gradually being applied in commercial processes. The environmental impacts of the processes are acceptable, but more supporting data are needed and the advantage over (co-)incineration remains to be proven.

PMID:
24373677
DOI:
10.1016/j.wasman.2013.11.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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