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Neuroimage Clin. 2013 Dec 7;4:174-81. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2013.11.011. eCollection 2014.

Altered intrahemispheric structural connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
2
Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany ; Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK ; Department of Pediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Lübeck, Germany.
3
Institute for Computational Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
4
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Faculty, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.
5
Clinic of Psychiatry, Socialpsychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Straße 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
6
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Faculty, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany ; Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation Unit, Department of Neurology, Düsseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.
7
Department of Pediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Lübeck, Germany.

Abstract

Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics and frequent psychiatric comorbidities, often causing significant disability. Tic generation has been linked to disturbed networks of brain areas involved in planning, controlling and execution of actions, particularly structural and functional disorders in the striatum and cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loops. We therefore applied structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize changes in intrahemispheric white matter connectivity in cortico-subcortical circuits engaged in motor control in 15 GTS patients without psychiatric comorbidities. White matter connectivity was analyzed by probabilistic fiber tractography between 12 predefined cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Connectivity values were combined with measures of clinical severity rated by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). GTS patients showed widespread structural connectivity deficits. Lower connectivity values were found specifically in tracts connecting the supplementary motor areas (SMA) with basal ganglia (pre-SMA-putamen, SMA-putamen) and in frontal cortico-cortical circuits. There was an overall trend towards negative correlations between structural connectivity in these tracts and YGTSS scores. Structural connectivity of frontal brain networks involved in planning, controlling and executing actions is reduced in adult GTS patients which is associated with tic severity. These findings are in line with the concept of GTS as a neurodevelopmental disorder of brain immaturity.

KEYWORDS:

Diffusion tensor imaging; MRI white matter imaging; Movement disorder

PMID:
24371800
PMCID:
PMC3872720
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2013.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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