Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Feb;22(1):34-41. doi: 10.1097/MOO.0000000000000013.

The optimal evaluation and management of patients with a gradual onset of olfactory loss.

Author information

1
aRhinology Unit and Smell Clinic, Otorhinolaryngology Department, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain bOtorhinolaryngology Department, Hospital Regional PEMEX Salamanca, Guanajuato, México cClinical & Experimental Respiratory Immunoallergy, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the causes of olfactory dysfunction, their evaluation and management, with a main focus on the gradual/progressive loss of smell.

RECENT FINDINGS:

As the sense of smell gives us essential information about our environment, its loss can cause nutritional and social problems while threatening an individual's safety. Recent surveys have shown quite a substantial prevalence of hyposmia (one out of four people) and anosmia (one out of 200 people) in a variety of populations.

SUMMARY:

Nasal inflammatory diseases such as allergic rhinitis and predominantly chronic rhinosinusitis account for the major and common causes of gradual/progressive loss of smell. However, they are also among the most successfully treated forms of olfactory dysfunction. The management of gradual/progressive smell deficit must always address its etiological causes. In most cases, a detailed medical history and nasal examination, smell testing, and imaging will help to establish an appropriate diagnosis. In addition to anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly nasal and systemic corticosteroids, recent investigations on smell training suggest that the controlled exposure to selected odors may increase olfactory performance.

VIDEO ABSTRACT AVAILABLE:

See the Video Supplementary Digital Content 1 (http://links.lww.com/COOH/A8).

PMID:
24370953
DOI:
10.1097/MOO.0000000000000013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - Ovid Insights
    Loading ...
    Support Center