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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014 Apr;114(4):663-73. doi: 10.1007/s00421-013-2801-x. Epub 2013 Dec 25.

Neuromuscular adaptations following 12-week maximal voluntary co-contraction training.

Author information

1
Department of Sports and Life Science, National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, 1 Shiromizu, Kanoya, Kagoshima, 891-2393, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The present study examined neuromuscular adaptations following 12-week maximal voluntary co-contraction training.

METHODS:

Sixteen young men were allocated to training (TG, n = 9) or control (CG, n = 7) group. TG conducted a training program (3 days/week), which consisted of 4-s maximal voluntary contractions of elbow flexors and extensors by simultaneously contracting both muscle groups at 90° of the elbow joint, followed by 4-s muscle relaxation (10 repetitions/set, 5 sets/day) for 12 weeks. In addition to the muscle thicknesses of elbow flexors and extensors, the torque and electromyograms (EMGs) of the two muscle groups during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were determined before (Pre), after 4 weeks, and 12 weeks of intervention.

RESULTS:

After intervention, CG showed no significant changes in all measured variables. In TG, MVC torque significantly increased in both elbow flexors (+13 % at 4 weeks and +15 % at 12 weeks) and extensors (+27 % at 4 weeks and +46 % at 12 weeks) from Pre. Muscle thickness also significantly increased in both elbow flexors (+4 %) and extensors (+4 %) at 12 weeks. Agonist EMG activities during MVC significantly increased in both elbow flexors (+31 % at 4 weeks and +44 % at 12 weeks) and extensors (+27 % at 4 weeks and +40 % at 12 weeks), without changes in antagonist involuntary coactivation level in both muscle groups.

CONCLUSION:

These results indicate that maximal voluntary co-contraction is applicable as a training modality for increasing the size and strength of antagonistic muscle pairs without increasing involuntary coactivation level.

PMID:
24368554
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-013-2801-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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