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J Phys Act Health. 2015 Jun 16;12 Suppl 1:S70-5. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2012-0359.

Walking to Work: The Roles of Neighborhood Walkability and Socioeconomic Deprivation.

Author information

1
Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Denver, CO.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are few studies that aimed to find a relationship between transportation-related physical activity and neighborhood socioeconomic condition using a composite deprivation index. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship of neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic deprivation with percentage of adults walking to work.

METHODS:

A walkability index and a socioeconomic deprivation index were created at block group-level. The outcome variable, percentage of adults who walk to work was dichotomized as < 5% of the block group walking to work low and ≥ 5% of the block group walking to work as high and applied logistic regression to examine the association of walkability and socioeconomic deprivation with walking to work.

RESULTS:

Individuals in the most walkable neighborhoods are almost 5 times more likely to walk to work than individuals in the least walkable neighborhoods (OR = 4.90, 95% CI = 2.80-8.59). After adjusting for neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, individuals in the most walkable neighborhoods are almost 3 times more likely to walk to work than individuals in the least walkable neighborhoods (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.62-5.49).

CONCLUSIONS:

Walkability (as measured by the walkability index) is a very strong indicator of walking to work even after controlling for neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage.

PMID:
24368284
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.2012-0359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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