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J Inorg Biochem. 2014 Jul;136:99-106. doi: 10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2013.10.025. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

Structural characterization of Cd²⁺ complexes in solution with DMSA and DMPS.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada. Electronic address: jgailer@ucalgary.ca.
3
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada.
4
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada. Electronic address: g.george@usask.ca.

Abstract

Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (DMPS) are chelating agents which have been used clinically to treat patients suffering from Pb(2+) or Hg(2+) exposure. Cd(2+) is a related environmental pollutant that is of increasing public health concern due to a demonstrated dose-response between urinary Cd level and an increased risk of diabetes. However, therapeutically effective chelating agents which enhance the excretion of Cd(2+) from humans have yet to be identified. Here we present a structural characterization of complexes of DMSA and DMPS with Cd(2+) at physiological pH using a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography and density functional theory. The results indicate a complex chemistry in which multi-metallic forms are important, but are consistent with both DMPS and DMSA acting as true chelators, using two thiolates for DMPS and one thiolate and one carboxylate for DMSA.

KEYWORDS:

Cadmium; Chelation therapy agents; X-ray absorption spectroscopy

PMID:
24367995
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2013.10.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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