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Psychosomatics. 2014 Mar-Apr;55(2):134-43. doi: 10.1016/j.psym.2013.08.012. Epub 2013 Dec 22.

The effect of serious mental illness on the risk of rehospitalization among patients with diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: lchwast@uw.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.
5
Washington Institute for Mental Health Research and Training, Washington State University, Spokane, WA.
6
College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, WA.
7
College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, WA; Providence Medical Research Center, Spokane, WA; Department of Medical Education & Biomedical Informatics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Medical-surgical rehospitalizations within a month after discharge among patients with diabetes result in tremendous costs to the US health care system.

OBJECTIVE:

The study's aim was to examine whether co-morbid serious mental illness diagnoses (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychotic disorders) among patients with diabetes are independently associated with medical-surgical rehospitalization within a month of discharge after an initial hospitalization.

METHODS:

This cohort study of all community hospitals in Washington state evaluated data from 82,060 adults discharged in the state of Washington with any International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis indicating diabetes mellitus between 2010 and 2011. Data on medical-surgical hospitalizations were obtained from the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Co-morbid serious mental illness diagnoses were identified based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes indicating bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychotic disorders. Logistic regression analyses identified factors independently associated with rehospitalization within a month of discharge. Cox proportional hazard analyses estimated time to rehospitalization for the entire study period.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for demographics, medical co-morbidity, and characteristics of the index hospitalization, co-morbid serious mental illness diagnosis was independently associated with increased odds of rehospitalization within 1 month among patients with diabetes who had a medical-surgical hospitalization (odds ratio: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 1.44). This increased risk of rehospitalization persisted throughout the study period (up to 24 mo).

CONCLUSIONS:

Co-morbid serious mental illness in patients with diabetes is independently associated with greater risk of early medical-surgical rehospitalization. Future research is needed to define and specify targets for interventions at points of care transition for this vulnerable patient population.

PMID:
24367898
PMCID:
PMC3997382
DOI:
10.1016/j.psym.2013.08.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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