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PLoS One. 2013 Dec 19;8(12):e84542. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084542. eCollection 2013.

History of having a macrosomic infant and the risk of diabetes: the Japan public health center-based prospective diabetes study.

Author information

1
Department of Diabetes Research, Diabetes Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan ; Department of Internal Medicine, Saiseikai Central Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Diabetes Research, Diabetes Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Clinical Research Coordination, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Division of Diabetes and Metabolism, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Japan.
5
Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan ; AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan;

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study was to test a hypothesis that a history of having a macrosomic infant (≥ 4000 g) is associated with the risk of diabetes.

METHODS:

Data on the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective diabetes cohort were analyzed, which is a population-based cohort study on diabetes. The survey of diabetes was performed at baseline and at the 5-year follow-up. A history of having a macrosomic infant was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 12,153 women who participated in the 5-year survey of the cohort. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between a history of having a macrosomic infant and the presence of diabetes. A longitudinal analysis was also conducted among 7,300 women without diabetes who participated in the baseline survey. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationship between a history of having a macrosomic infant and the incidence of diabetes between the baseline survey and the 5-year survey.

RESULTS:

In the cross-sectional analysis, parous women with a positive history were more likely to have diabetes in relation to parous women without (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.13-1.83). The longitudinal analysis showed a modest but non-significant increased risk of developing diabetes among women with a positive history (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.80-1.94).

CONCLUSIONS:

An increased risk of diabetes was implied among women with a history of having a macrosomic infant although the longitudinal analysis showed a non-significant increased risk.

PMID:
24367673
PMCID:
PMC3868652
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0084542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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