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PLoS One. 2013 Dec 18;8(12):e82300. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082300. eCollection 2013.

High-throughput multi-analyte Luminex profiling implicates eotaxin-1 in ulcerative colitis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
6
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America ; Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.

Abstract

Accurate and high-throughput technologies are needed for identification of new therapeutic targets and for optimizing therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. Our aim was to assess multi-analyte protein-based assays of cytokines/chemokines using Luminex technology. We have reported that Luminex-based profiling was useful in assessing response to L-arginine therapy in the mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium colitis. Therefore, we studied prospectively collected samples from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and control subjects. Serum, colon biopsies, and clinical information were obtained from subjects undergoing colonoscopy for evaluation of UC or for non-UC indications. In total, 38 normal controls and 137 UC cases completed the study. Histologic disease severity and the Mayo Disease Activity Index (DAI) were assessed. Serum and colonic tissue cytokine/chemokine profiles were measured by Luminex-based multiplex testing of 42 analytes. Only eotaxin-1 and G-CSF were increased in serum of patients with histologically active UC vs. controls. While 13 cytokines/chemokines were increased in active UC vs. controls in tissues, only eotaxin-1 was increased in all levels of active disease in both serum and tissue. In tissues, eotaxin-1 correlated with the DAI and with eosinophil counts. Increased eotaxin-1 levels were confirmed by real-time PCR. Tissue eotaxin-1 levels were also increased in experimental murine colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium, oxazolone, or Citrobacter rodentium, but not in murine Helicobacter pylori infection. Our data implicate eotaxin-1 as an etiologic factor and therapeutic target in UC, and indicate that Luminex-based assays may be useful to assess IBD pathogenesis and to select patients for anti-cytokine/chemokine therapies.

PMID:
24367513
PMCID:
PMC3867379
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0082300
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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