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PLoS Comput Biol. 2013;9(12):e1003395. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003395. Epub 2013 Dec 19.

Utilizing a dynamical description of IspH to aid in the development of novel antimicrobial drugs.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
3
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America ; Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.

Abstract

The nonmevalonate pathway is responsible for isoprenoid production in microbes, including H. pylori, M. tuberculosis and P. falciparum, but is nonexistent in humans, thus providing a desirable route for antibacterial and antimalarial drug discovery. We coordinate a structural study of IspH, a [4Fe-4S] protein responsible for converting HMBPP to IPP and DMAPP in the ultimate step in the nonmevalonate pathway. By performing accelerated molecular dynamics simulations on both substrate-free and HMBPP-bound [Fe4S4](2+) IspH, we elucidate how substrate binding alters the dynamics of the protein. Using principal component analysis, we note that while substrate-free IspH samples various open and closed conformations, the closed conformation observed experimentally for HMBPP-bound IspH is inaccessible in the absence of HMBPP. In contrast, simulations with HMBPP bound are restricted from accessing the open states sampled by the substrate-free simulations. Further investigation of the substrate-free simulations reveals large fluctuations in the HMBPP binding pocket, as well as allosteric pocket openings - both of which are achieved through the hinge motions of the individual domains in IspH. Coupling these findings with solvent mapping and various structural analyses reveals alternative druggable sites that may be exploited in future drug design efforts.

PMID:
24367248
PMCID:
PMC3868525
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003395
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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