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Nat Rev Neurol. 2014 Feb;10(2):115-9. doi: 10.1038/nrneurol.2013.269. Epub 2013 Dec 24.

Sleep and Alzheimer disease pathology--a bidirectional relationship.

Author information

1
Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Washington University, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Box 8111, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Abstract

Factors other than age and genetics may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD). Accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain seems to initiate a cascade of key events in the pathogenesis of AD. Moreover, evidence is emerging that the sleep-wake cycle directly influences levels of Aβ in the brain. In experimental models, sleep deprivation increases the concentration of soluble Aβ and results in chronic accumulation of Aβ, whereas sleep extension has the opposite effect. Furthermore, once Aβ accumulates, increased wakefulness and altered sleep patterns develop. Individuals with early Aβ deposition who still have normal cognitive function report sleep abnormalities, as do individuals with very mild dementia due to AD. Thus, sleep and neurodegenerative disease may influence each other in many ways that have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of AD.

PMID:
24366271
PMCID:
PMC3979317
DOI:
10.1038/nrneurol.2013.269
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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