Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2013 Dec 23;369(1635):20120533. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2012.0533. Print 2014 Feb 5.

Neural systems for landmark-based wayfinding in humans.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, , 3720 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Erratum in

Abstract

Humans and animals use landmarks during wayfinding to determine where they are in the world and to guide their way to their destination. To implement this strategy, known as landmark-based piloting, a navigator must be able to: (i) identify individual landmarks, (ii) use these landmarks to determine their current position and heading, (iii) access long-term knowledge about the spatial relationships between locations and (iv) use this knowledge to plan a route to their navigational goal. Here, we review neuroimaging, neuropsychological and neurophysiological data that link the first three of these abilities to specific neural systems in the human brain. This evidence suggests that the parahippocampal place area is critical for landmark recognition, the retrosplenial/medial parietal region is centrally involved in localization and orientation, and both medial temporal lobe and retrosplenial/medial parietal lobe regions support long-term spatial knowledge.

KEYWORDS:

functional magnetic resonance imaging; hippocampus; parahippocampal cortex; parietal lobe; retrosplenial cortex; spatial navigation

PMID:
24366141
PMCID:
PMC3866451
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2012.0533
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center