Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Methods. 2014 Mar;11(3):325-32. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2765. Epub 2013 Dec 22.

Optogenetic control of Drosophila using a red-shifted channelrhodopsin reveals experience-dependent influences on courtship.

Author information

1
1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Pasadena, California, USA. [2] Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA. [3].
2
1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Pasadena, California, USA. [2] Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA.
3
Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA.
4
Department of Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
5
1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Pasadena, California, USA. [2] Department of Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

Abstract

Optogenetics allows the manipulation of neural activity in freely moving animals with millisecond precision, but its application in Drosophila melanogaster has been limited. Here we show that a recently described red activatable channelrhodopsin (ReaChR) permits control of complex behavior in freely moving adult flies, at wavelengths that are not thought to interfere with normal visual function. This tool affords the opportunity to control neural activity over a broad dynamic range of stimulation intensities. Using time-resolved activation, we show that the neural control of male courtship song can be separated into (i) probabilistic, persistent and (ii) deterministic, command-like components. The former, but not the latter, neurons are subject to functional modulation by social experience, which supports the idea that they constitute a locus of state-dependent influence. This separation is not evident using thermogenetic tools, a result underscoring the importance of temporally precise control of neuronal activation in the functional dissection of neural circuits in Drosophila.

PMID:
24363022
PMCID:
PMC4151318
DOI:
10.1038/nmeth.2765
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center