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Nat Immunol. 2014 Feb;15(2):143-51. doi: 10.1038/ni.2797. Epub 2013 Dec 22.

Activation of neutrophils by autocrine IL-17A-IL-17RC interactions during fungal infection is regulated by IL-6, IL-23, RORγt and dectin-2.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
2
1] Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. [2].
3
Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
4
Department of Immunology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Erratum in

  • Nat Immunol. 2015 Feb;16(2):214.

Abstract

Here we identified a population of bone marrow neutrophils that constitutively expressed the transcription factor RORγt and produced and responded to interleukin 17A (IL-17A (IL-17)). IL-6, IL-23 and RORγt, but not T cells or natural killer (NK) cells, were required for IL-17 production in neutrophils. IL-6 and IL-23 induced expression of the receptors IL-17RC and dectin-2 on neutrophils, and IL-17RC expression was augmented by activation of dectin-2. Autocrine activity of IL-17A and its receptor induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased fungal killing in vitro and in a model of Aspergillus-induced keratitis. Human neutrophils also expressed RORγt and induced the expression of IL-17A, IL-17RC and dectin-2 following stimulation with IL-6 and IL-23. Our findings identify a population of human and mouse neutrophils with autocrine IL-17 activity that probably contribute to the etiology of microbial and inflammatory diseases.

PMID:
24362892
PMCID:
PMC3972892
DOI:
10.1038/ni.2797
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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