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Drug Discov Today. 2014 Jun;19(6):735-42. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2013.12.006. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

In vitro models of the metastatic cascade: from local invasion to extravasation.

Author information

1
Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy; Cell and Tissue Engineering Lab, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy.
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
3
Cell and Tissue Engineering Lab, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy. Electronic address: matteo.moretti@grupposandonato.it.
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address: rdkamm@mit.edu.

Abstract

A crucial event in the metastatic cascade is the extravasation of circulating cancer cells from blood capillaries to the surrounding tissues. The past 5 years have been characterized by a significant evolution in the development of in vitro extravasation models, which moved from traditional transmigration chambers to more sophisticated microfluidic devices, enabling the study of complex cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in multicellular, controlled environments. These advanced assays could be applied to screen easily and rapidly a broad spectrum of molecules inhibiting cancer cell endothelial adhesion and extravasation, thus contributing to the design of more focused in vivo tests.

PMID:
24361339
PMCID:
PMC4048792
DOI:
10.1016/j.drudis.2013.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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