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Cell. 2013 Dec 19;155(7):1446-8. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.11.035.

Toward effective probiotics for autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Author information

1
Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
2
Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, 1001 South McAllister Avenue, Tempe, AZĀ 85287-5701, USA; School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5701, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
4
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: rob.knight@colorado.edu.

Abstract

Hsaio and colleagues link gut microbes to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in a mouse model. They show that ASD symptoms are triggered by compositional and structural shifts of microbes and associated metabolites, but symptoms are relieved by a Bacteroides fragilis probiotic. Thus probiotics may provide therapeutic strategies for neurodevelopmental disorders.

PMID:
24360269
PMCID:
PMC4166551
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2013.11.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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