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PLoS Biol. 2013 Dec;11(12):e1001739. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001739. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Par1b induces asymmetric inheritance of plasma membrane domains via LGN-dependent mitotic spindle orientation in proliferating hepatocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America.
3
Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, United States of America.

Erratum in

  • PLoS Biol. 2014 Jan;12(1). doi:10.1371/annotation/aacd66b6-d706-4f59-a79a-5d55f83d17ca.

Abstract

The development and maintenance of polarized epithelial tissue requires a tightly controlled orientation of mitotic cell division relative to the apical polarity axis. Hepatocytes display a unique polarized architecture. We demonstrate that mitotic hepatocytes asymmetrically segregate their apical plasma membrane domain to the nascent daughter cells. The non-polarized nascent daughter cell can form a de novo apical domain with its new neighbor. This asymmetric segregation of apical domains is facilitated by a geometrically distinct "apicolateral" subdomain of the lateral surface present in hepatocytes. The polarity protein partitioning-defective 1/microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 2 (Par1b/MARK2) translates this positional landmark to cortical polarity by promoting the apicolateral accumulation of Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein (LGN) and the capture of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)-positive astral microtubules to orientate the mitotic spindle. Proliferating hepatocytes thus display an asymmetric inheritance of their apical domains via a mechanism that involves Par1b and LGN, which we postulate serves the unique tissue architecture of the developing liver parenchyma.

PMID:
24358023
PMCID:
PMC3866089
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.1001739
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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