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Am J Prev Med. 2014 Jan;46(1):80-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.009.

Physicians' human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations, 2009 and 2011.

Author information

1
Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Tampa, Florida; Center for Infection Research in Cancer, Tampa, Florida; Department of Oncologic Sciences, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: susan.vadaparampil@moffitt.org.
2
Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Tampa, Florida.
3
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.
4
Institute for Vaccine Safety, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
5
Biostatistics Department, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida.
6
Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Tampa, Florida; Department of Oncologic Sciences, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
7
Department of Family Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
8
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
9
Center for Infection Research in Cancer, Tampa, Florida; Cancer Epidemiology Program, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; Department of Oncologic Sciences, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physician recommendation is a key predictor of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake. Understanding factors associated with recommendation is important for efforts to increase current suboptimal vaccine uptake.

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to examine physician recommendations to vaccinate female patients aged 11-26 years, in 2009 and 2011, at 3 and 5 years postvaccine licensure, respectively. A second aim was to identify trends in factors associated with vaccine recommendation for ages 11 and 12 years.

METHODS:

Nationally representative samples of physicians practicing family medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics and gynecology were randomly selected from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile (n=1538 in 2009, n=1541 in 2011). A mailed survey asked physicians about patient and clinical practice characteristics; immunization support; and frequency of HPV vaccine recommendation ("always" ≥75% of the time vs other). Analyses were conducted in 2012.

RESULTS:

Completed surveys were received from 1013 eligible physicians (68% response rate) in 2009 and 928 (63%) in 2011. The proportion of physicians who reported always recommending HPV vaccine increased significantly from 2009 to 2011 for patients aged 11 or 12 years (35% vs 40%, respectively; p=0.03), but not for patients aged 13-17 years (53% vs 55%; p=0.28) or 18-26 years (50% vs 52%; p=0.52). Physician specialty, age, and perceived issues/barriers to vaccination were associated with vaccine recommendation for patients aged 11 or 12 in both years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest a modest increase in recommendations for HPV vaccination of girls aged 11 or 12 years over a 2-year period; however, recommendations remain suboptimal for all age groups despite national recommendations for universal immunization.

PMID:
24355675
PMCID:
PMC3895928
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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