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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Apr;95(4):726-33. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.11.018. Epub 2013 Dec 16.

Peripheral nerve function and lower extremity muscle power in older men.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
2
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
3
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA.
4
VA Pittsburgh HCS and Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
5
Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR.
6
Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, Orlando, FL.
7
California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.
8
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Electronic address: StrotmeyerE@edc.pitt.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve function is associated with muscle power in community-dwelling older men.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal cohort study with 2.3±0.3 years of follow-up.

SETTING:

One clinical site.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants (n=372; mean age ± SD, 77.2±5.1y; 99.5% white; body mass index, 27.9±3.7kg/m(2); power, 1.88±0.6W/kg) at 1 site of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (N=5994).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

A nerve function ancillary study was performed 4.6±0.4 years after baseline. Muscle power was measured using a power rig. Peroneal motor nerve conduction amplitude, distal motor latency, and mean f-wave latency were measured. Sensory nerve function was assessed using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and sural sensory nerve conduction amplitude and distal latency. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms at the leg and feet were assessed by self-report.

RESULTS:

After adjustments for age, height, and total body lean and fat mass, 1 SD lower motor (β=-.07, P<.05) and sensory amplitude (β=-.09, P<.05) and 1.4-g (β=-.11, P<.05) and 10-g monofilament insensitivity (β=-.17, P<.05) were associated with lower muscle power/kg. Compared with the effect of age on muscle power (β per year, -.05; P<.001), this was equivalent to aging 1.4 years for motor amplitude, 1.8 years for sensory amplitude, 2.2 years for 1.4-g monofilament detection, and 3.4 years for 10-g detection. Baseline 1.4-g monofilament detection predicted a greater decline in muscle power/kg. Short-term change in nerve function was not associated with concurrent short-term change in muscle power/kg.

CONCLUSIONS:

Worse sensory and motor nerve function were associated with lower muscle power/kg and are likely important for impaired muscle function in older men. Monofilament sensitivity was associated with a greater decline in muscle power/kg, and screening may identify an early risk for muscle function decline in late life, which has implications for disability.

KEYWORDS:

Aged; Motor neurons; Muscle weakness; Peripheral nerves; Rehabilitation; Sensory function; Sensory neurons

PMID:
24355427
PMCID:
PMC3972273
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2013.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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