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Neurosci Lett. 2014 Feb 7;560:26-30. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2013.12.011. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Cerebrovascular perfusion among older adults is moderated by strength training and gender.

Author information

1
Idaho State University, Department of Psychology, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA; Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: xuxiao@isu.edu.
2
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA; Butler Hospital Neuroimaging Center, Providence, RI 02906, USA.
3
Butler Hospital Neuroimaging Center, Providence, RI 02906, USA.
4
Brown University, Department of Neuroscience, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
5
Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Psychology, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
6
Butler Hospital Neuroimaging Center, Providence, RI 02906, USA; Columbia University Teachers College, Department of Clinical Psychology, New York, NY 10027-6696, USA.
7
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Neurology, New York, NY 10029, USA.
8
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
9
Kent State University, Department of Psychology, Kent, OH 44242, USA.
10
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Medicine, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
11
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA; University of Florida, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory, Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry and Aging, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.
12
Université de Montréal, Departments of Neuroscience and Radiology, Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada.
13
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI 02912, USA; Butler Hospital Neuroimaging Center, Providence, RI 02906, USA; University of Georgia, Department of Psychology, Athens, GA 30602-3013, USA.

Abstract

Cerebral perfusion is important in older adults as it is linked to cognitive declines. Physical activity can improve blood flow in the body but little is known about the relationship between physical activity and cerebral perfusion in older adults. In particular, no study has investigated the relation between strength training and cerebral perfusion. We examined whether different types of physical activity (assessed with the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity questionnaire) were associated with MRI cerebrovascular perfusion in 59 older adults. There was a significant interaction between gender and strength training, such that women who engaged in strength training (weight lifting or calisthenics) at least once per week exhibited significantly greater cerebrovascular perfusion than women who did not. This interaction remained significant after controlling for other physical activity, demographics, and health variables. These findings suggest that regular strength training can be beneficial for cerebrovascular health in women.

KEYWORDS:

ASL; Cerebral perfusion; Physical activity; Sex; Strength training

PMID:
24355360
PMCID:
PMC3920729
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2013.12.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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