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Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2014 Mar-Apr;10(2):335-9. doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2013.09.011. Epub 2013 Sep 21.

Total weight loss associated with increased physical activity after bariatric surgery may increase the need for total joint arthroplasty.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Department of Orthopaedics, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: esmith@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.
3
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Retrospectively, our institution noticed an increased number of patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA) after bariatric surgery. Considering that bariatric surgery is a proven modality to reduce osteoarthritic pain, we sought to identify a reason some patients may later require TJA. The objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that rapid or increased weight loss after bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for TJA.

METHODS:

Weight loss parameters were retrospectively assessed in 15 bariatric surgery patients who subsequently received a primary TJA and compared with matched bariatric controls.

RESULTS:

Patients who required a TJA lost 27.9% more of their body mass index (BMI) compared with controls (P = .049). Furthermore, patients who underwent TJA 25-48 months postbariatric surgery lost 78.2% more of their BMI compared with controls (P<.001). Total knee arthroplasty patients lost 43.9% more of their BMI compared with controls (P = .02), and the difference in BMI change for total hip arthroplasty patients was not significant versus controls.

CONCLUSION:

These results contradict the tenant that weight loss is universally protective against arthritis and merit larger prospective investigations.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; Rapid weight loss; Total hip arthroplasty; Total knee arthroplasty

PMID:
24355323
DOI:
10.1016/j.soard.2013.09.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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