Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Feb;35(2):414-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.11.021. Epub 2013 Dec 18.

Household task participation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and typical development.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Physical Education, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP 31270-010, Brazil. Electronic address: mairaferreira.to@gmail.com.
2
Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Physical Education, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP 31270-010, Brazil. Electronic address: drummond@ufmg.br.
3
Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: wjcoster@bu.edu.
4
Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Physical Education, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP 31270-010, Brazil. Electronic address: mcmancini@ufmg.br.

Abstract

This cross-sectional study compared patterns of household task participation (e.g., performance, assistance and independence) of youth with cerebral palsy (CP), Down syndrome (DS) and typical development (TD). Parents of 75 children and adolescents were interviewed to report on their youths' active engagement in daily self-care and family-care tasks, using the children helping out: responsibilities, expectations and supports (CHORES) questionnaire. Groups were equivalent in age (mean=9.3 years; SD=2.2 years), sex (male=39; female=36), respondent education, presence of maid, and number of siblings at home, but differed on child cognitive function and family socioeconomic status, with the DS and the CP groups scoring lower than the TD group but not different from each other. ANOVA revealed group differences on CHORES performance of self-care tasks (p=0.004), on total participation score (p=0.04) and on assistance scores (p<0.02). Post hoc comparisons showed that TD group scored higher than CP and DS groups on performance and assistance in self-care tasks and total assistance; TD and CP groups were similar on total performance and assistance in family-care tasks. The groups also differed on independence indices; the TD index was greater than the CP and DS, and the CP index was greater than the DS. Parents from the three groups did not differ on ratings of importance regarding their children's household participation (p=0.416). In spite of observed differences, children and adolescents with CP and DS are actively engaged in daily self-care and family-care tasks; their participation at home is not prevented by the presence of their disabilities.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood disability; Home participation; Independence; Youth

PMID:
24355162
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2013.11.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center