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Fertil Steril. 2014 Mar;101(3):759-66. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.008. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Female dietary antioxidant intake and time to pregnancy among couples treated for unexplained infertility.

Author information

1
Department of Sports Medicine and Nutrition, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: eruder@pitt.edu.
2
Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether increased antioxidant intake in women is associated with shorter time to pregnancy (TTP) among a cohort of couples being treated for unexplained infertility.

DESIGN:

Secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Academic medical center associated with a private infertility center.

PATIENTS:

Females with unexplained infertility.

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

The time it took to establish a pregnancy that led to a live birth.

RESULT(S):

Mean nutrient intake exceeded the estimated average requirement (EAR) for vitamins C and E. No differences in mean intake of any of the antioxidants were noted between women who delivered a live-born infant during the study period vs. those who did not. In multivariable models, intake of β-carotene from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.53) and women <35 y (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.41). Intake of vitamin C from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.15) and women <35 y (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18). Intake of vitamin E from dietary supplements among women ≥35 y also was associated with shorter TTP (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13).

CONCLUSION(S):

Shorter TTP was observed among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) with increasing vitamin C, women with BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) with increasing β-carotene, women <35 y with increasing β-carotene and vitamin C, and women ≥35 y with increasing vitamin E.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:

NCT00260091.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; antioxidants; nutritional epidemiology; oxidative stress; unexplained infertility

PMID:
24355050
PMCID:
PMC3943921
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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