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J Sports Sci Med. 2006 Sep 1;5(3):459-65. eCollection 2006.

The effects of a 6-week plyometric training program on agility.

Author information

1
Department of HPER, Western Michigan University , MI, USA.
2
University of Texas-Arlington , USA.

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine if six weeks of plyometric training can improve an athlete's agility. Subjects were divided into two groups, a plyometric training and a control group. The plyometric training group performed in a six week plyometric training program and the control group did not perform any plyometric training techniques. All subjects participated in two agility tests: T-test and Illinois Agility Test, and a force plate test for ground reaction times both pre and post testing. Univariate ANCOVAs were conducted to analyze the change scores (post - pre) in the independent variables by group (training or control) with pre scores as covariates. The Univariate ANCOVA revealed a significant group effect F2,26 = 25.42, p=0.0000 for the T-test agility measure. For the Illinois Agility test, a significant group effect F2,26 = 27.24, p = 0.000 was also found. The plyometric training group had quicker posttest times compared to the control group for the agility tests. A significant group effect F2,26 = 7.81, p = 0.002 was found for the Force Plate test. The plyometric training group reduced time on the ground on the posttest compared to the control group. The results of this study show that plyometric training can be an effective training technique to improve an athlete's agility. Key PointsPlyometric training can enhance agility of athletes.6 weeks of plyometric training is sufficient to see agility results.Ground reaction times are decreased with plyometric training.

KEYWORDS:

Jumping; performance variables; quickness; training

PMID:
24353464
PMCID:
PMC3842147

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