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Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Dec 9;72:21856. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21856. eCollection 2013.

Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

Author information

1
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
2
Dubna City Hospital, Moscow Oblast, Russia.
3
Division of Nutritional Research, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden ; Arcum - Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
4
Arcum - Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden ; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories.

OBJECTIVES:

The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000-2011), and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples) have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000-2011).

RESULTS:

Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis.

CONCLUSION:

Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000-2011) are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance (including gender-divided statistics), enhancement of laboratory diagnostics and the introduction of preventive actions are urgently needed.

KEYWORDS:

Russian Arctic; food- and waterborne diseases; infections; parasites

PMID:
24350064
PMCID:
PMC3860330
DOI:
10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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