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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2013 Dec 12;7(12):e2590. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002590. eCollection 2013.

Temporal patterns of abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and mitochondrial DNA analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic.

Author information

1
Institut Pasteur de Bangui, Bangui, Central African Republic.
2
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, Franceville, Gabon ; Laboratoire des Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Écologie, Génétique, Évolution et Contrôle, UMR 224-5290, CNRS-IRD-UM1-UM2, IRD Montpellier, France.

Abstract

The invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) was first reported in central Africa in 2000, in Cameroon, with the indigenous mosquito species Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Today, this invasive species is present in almost all countries of the region, including the Central African Republic (CAR), where it was first recorded in 2009. As invasive species of mosquitoes can affect the distribution of native species, resulting in new patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease, we undertook a comparative study early and late in the wet season in the capital and the main cities of CAR to document infestation and the ecological preferences of the two species. In addition, we determined the probable geographical origin of invasive populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes, COI and ND5. Analysis revealed that Ae. aegypti was more abundant earlier in the wet season and Ae. albopictus in the late wet season. Used tyres were the most heavily colonized productive larval habitats for both species in both seasons. The invasive species Ae. albopictus predominated over the resident species at all sites in which the two species were sympatric. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus in CAR. Phylogeographical analysis based on COI polymorphism indicated that the Ae. albopictus haplotype in the CAR population segregated into two lineages, suggesting multiple sources of Ae. albopictus. These data may have important implications for vector control strategies in central Africa.

PMID:
24349596
PMCID:
PMC3861192
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0002590
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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