Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2014 Feb;29(2):218-22. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2013.11.007. Epub 2013 Nov 15.

Quadriceps force during knee extension in different replacement scenarios with a modular partial prosthesis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Str. 3, 30625 Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: tilman.calliess@ddh-gruppe.de.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Str. 3, 30625 Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous biomechanical studies have shown that bi-cruciate retaining knee replacement does not significantly alter normal knee kinematics, however, there are no data on the influence of a combined medial and patellofemoral bi-compartimental arthroplasty. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different replacement scenarios with a modular partial knee replacement system on the amount of quadriceps force required to extend the knee during an isokinetic extension cycle.

METHODS:

Ten human knee specimens were tested in a kinematic knee simulator under (1) physiologic condition and after subsequent implantation of (2) a medial unicondylar and (3) a trochlear replacement. An isokinetic extension cycle of the knee with a constant extension moment of 31 Nm was simulated. The resulting quadriceps extension force was measured from 120° to full knee extension.

FINDINGS:

The quadriceps force curve described a typically sinusoidal characteristic before and after each replacement scenario. The isolated medial replacement resulted in a slightly, but significantly higher maximum quadriceps force (1510 N vs. 1585 N, P = 0.006) as well as the subsequent trochlear replacement showed an additional increase (1801 N, P = 0.008). However, for both replacements no significant difference to the untreated condition could be detected in mid-flexion (10-50°).

INTERPRETATION:

When considering a bi-compartimental replacement an increase of required maximum quadriceps force needed to extend the knee has to keep in mind. However, the close to physiological movement in mid-flexion suggests that patients with a bi-crutiate retaining arthroplasty might have an advantage in knee stability compared to total knee arthroplasty.

KEYWORDS:

Arthroplasty; Biomechanics; In-vitro; Partial knee replacement; Patellofemoral; Quadrizeps force; Unicondylar knee replacement

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center