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Nat Commun. 2013;4:2946. doi: 10.1038/ncomms3946.

A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

Author information

1
1] German Consortium for Cancer Research (DKTK), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Breisacher Straße 60a, D-79098, Freiburg, Germany [3] German Cancer Research (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Breisacher Straße 60a, D-79098, Freiburg, Germany.
3
Centre for Hyperpolarisation in Magnetic Resonance, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.
4
1] Department of Microsystems Engineering-IMTEK, Universität Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110, Freiburg, Germany [2] Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies-FRIAS, Universität Freiburg, 79104, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

PMID:
24336292
PMCID:
PMC3905697
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms3946
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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