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Nat Immunol. 2014 Feb;15(2):195-204. doi: 10.1038/ni.2789. Epub 2013 Dec 15.

Molecular signatures of antibody responses derived from a systems biology study of five human vaccines.

Author information

1
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [3].
2
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University, Decatur, Georgia, USA. [3].
3
Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center of Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
4
1] Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texas, USA.
5
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
6
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
7
Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texas, USA.
8
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University, Decatur, Georgia, USA. [3] Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
9
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
10
1] Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [2] Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. [3] Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

Many vaccines induce protective immunity via antibodies. Systems biology approaches have been used to determine signatures that can be used to predict vaccine-induced immunity in humans, but whether there is a 'universal signature' that can be used to predict antibody responses to any vaccine is unknown. Here we did systems analyses of immune responses to the polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines against meningococcus in healthy adults, in the broader context of published studies of vaccines against yellow fever virus and influenza virus. To achieve this, we did a large-scale network integration of publicly available human blood transcriptomes and systems-scale databases in specific biological contexts and deduced a set of transcription modules in blood. Those modules revealed distinct transcriptional signatures of antibody responses to different classes of vaccines, which provided key insights into primary viral, protein recall and anti-polysaccharide responses. Our results elucidate the early transcriptional programs that orchestrate vaccine immunity in humans and demonstrate the power of integrative network modeling.

PMID:
24336226
PMCID:
PMC3946932
DOI:
10.1038/ni.2789
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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