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Nat Rev Immunol. 2014 Jan;14(1):24-35. doi: 10.1038/nri3567. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

Human memory T cells: generation, compartmentalization and homeostasis.

Author information

1
1] Columbia Center for Translational Immunology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, 650 West 168th Street, BB1501, New York, New York 10032, USA. [2] Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, 650 West 168th Street, BB1501, New York 10032, USA.
2
Columbia Center for Translational Immunology and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, 650 West 168th Street, BB1501, New York, New York 10032, USA.
3
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Abstract

Memory T cells constitute the most abundant lymphocyte population in the body for the majority of a person's lifetime; however, our understanding of memory T cell generation, function and maintenance mainly derives from mouse studies, which cannot recapitulate the exposure to multiple pathogens that occurs over many decades in humans. In this Review, we discuss studies focused on human memory T cells that reveal key properties of these cells, including subset heterogeneity and diverse tissue residence in multiple mucosal and lymphoid tissue sites. We also review how the function and the adaptability of human memory T cells depend on spatial and temporal compartmentalization.

PMID:
24336101
PMCID:
PMC4032067
DOI:
10.1038/nri3567
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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