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Pharmacol Rev. 2013 Dec 11;66(1):102-92. doi: 10.1124/pr.113.008029. Print 2014.

Purinergic signaling and blood vessels in health and disease.

Author information

1
Autonomic Neuroscience Centre, University College Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK; and Department of Pharmacology, The University of Melbourne, Australia. g.burnstock@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Purinergic signaling plays important roles in control of vascular tone and remodeling. There is dual control of vascular tone by ATP released as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline from perivascular sympathetic nerves to cause vasoconstriction via P2X1 receptors, whereas ATP released from endothelial cells in response to changes in blood flow (producing shear stress) or hypoxia acts on P2X and P2Y receptors on endothelial cells to produce nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, which dilates vessels. ATP is also released from sensory-motor nerves during antidromic reflex activity to produce relaxation of some blood vessels. In this review, we stress the differences in neural and endothelial factors in purinergic control of different blood vessels. The long-term (trophic) actions of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotides in promoting migration and proliferation of both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells via P1 and P2Y receptors during angiogenesis and vessel remodeling during restenosis after angioplasty are described. The pathophysiology of blood vessels and therapeutic potential of purinergic agents in diseases, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemia, thrombosis and stroke, diabetes, and migraine, is discussed.

PMID:
24335194
DOI:
10.1124/pr.113.008029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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