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J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Feb 3;151(2):937-43. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2013.12.004. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Cnidoscolus chayamansa Mc Vaugh, an important antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective plant used in Mexico.

Author information

1
Unidad de Servicios de Apoyo en Resolución Analítica, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz 91190, Mexico. Electronic address: rosagarcia02@uv.mx.
2
Unidad de Servicios de Apoyo en Resolución Analítica, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz 91190, Mexico.
3
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Dr. Luis Castelazo Ayala S/N, Col. Industrial Ánimas, CP. 91190, Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico; Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Prolongación de Oriente 6 #1009, Col. Rafael Alvarado, CP. 94340, Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico.
4
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Dr. Luis Castelazo Ayala S/N, Col. Industrial Ánimas, CP. 91190, Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico.
5
Instituto de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz, Mexico.
6
Instituto de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz, Mexico; Unidad de Servicios de Apoyo en Resolución Analítica, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz 91190, Mexico.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Cnidoscolus chayamansa Mc Vaugh (Euphorbiaceae) is commonly known as 'chaya' in Central America. In South East Mexico, because of its high nutritional values, is an important part of the diet of many indigenous communities. Chaya is also used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of diabetes, rheumatism, gastrointestinal disorders and inflammation-related diseases. Although Cnidoscolus chayamansa is one of most used and valued medicinal plants, only few studies on documenting its pharmacological properties can be found.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Dried leaves of Cnidoscolus chayamansa were subjected to a successive maceration using Hex, EtOAc and EtOH. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were tested using the DPPH radical scavenging, Ferric reducing/antioxidant power and total phenolic content assays. To determine the anti-inflammatory activity, the TPA-induced mouse ear edema and the carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema assays were used. The cardioprotective effects of the EtOH extract was determined using the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model. Finally, the acute toxicity was determined using Lorke's method.

RESULTS:

The results showed a similar anti-inflammatory activity (≈30%) for all extracts but only the EtOAc extract showed relevant activity when applied intraperitoneally. When tested for their antioxidant activity none of the extracts showed a significant activity suggesting that the antinflammatory activity is not related to a direct free radical scavenging of the extracts. Additionally, the EtOH extract showed a strong cardioprotective effect at 500mg/kg when given orally. Both the EtOAc and the EtOH extract have a LD50 >5g/kg, confirming their safety in acute oral administration.

CONCLUSIONS:

All these results are relevant for a better understanding of the therapeutic used of Cnidoscolus chayamansa in the Mexican traditional medicine and highlights its cardioprotective potential.

KEYWORDS:

Acute toxicity; Anti-inflammatory; Antioxidant; Cardioprotective; Cnidoscolus chayamansa; Mexican traditional medicine

PMID:
24333962
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2013.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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