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Gastroenterology. 2014 Mar;146(3):647-51. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.12.007. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Pancreatic Cancer Center, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: arhim@med.umich.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
3
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
4
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Pancreatic Cancer Center, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
5
Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
7
Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
8
Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
9
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. Electronic address: kirby@cornell.edu.
10
Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: stanger@exchange.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

KEYWORDS:

Circulating Tumor Cells; Early Detection; IPMN; Pancreatic Cancer

PMID:
24333829
PMCID:
PMC4514438
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2013.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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