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Vaccine. 2014 Feb 3;32(6):657-63. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.12.008. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

Antibody but not memory B-cell responses are tuned-down in vertically HIV-1 infected children and young individuals being vaccinated yearly against influenza.

Author information

1
Chair of Pediatrics, Department of System Medicine, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy.
2
University Department of Pediatrics, DPUO, Unit of Immune and Infectious Diseases, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Piazza S. Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy.
3
WHO National Influenza Centre - Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immunomediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Rome, Italy.
4
University Department of Pediatrics, DPUO, Unit of Immune and Infectious Diseases, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Piazza S. Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: paolo.palma@opbg.net.
5
University Department of Pediatrics, DPUO, Unit of Immune and Infectious Diseases, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Piazza S. Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: alberto.cagigi@gmail.com.

Abstract

Yearly immunization against seasonal influenza is highly recommended for HIV-1 infected individuals but evaluating the success of vaccination by serological markers may not be fully informative in this population. Recently, it has been hypothesized that the generation of long-lasting immune responses may depend on whether similar antigens challenge the immune system frequently and intermittently. In the present study, in order to search for additional correlates of vaccine-induced protective immunity and to further dissect this theory, both humoral and memory B-cell responses to the trivalent 2012-2013 seasonal influenza vaccination has been evaluated by strain-specific (separately for H1N1, H3N2 and B strain) standard hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and B-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) in a cohort of vertically HIV-1 infected children and young individuals as compared to age-matched healthy controls. A high number of HIV-1 infected individuals had protective antibody levels prior to vaccination and showed low seroconversion rates after vaccination as compared to healthy controls. On the contrary, similar frequencies of influenza-specific memory B-cells were detected by B-cell ELISpot in both groups suggesting that an adequate B-cell response has been elicited. Data from the H1N1 strain, which is recurrent in seasonal influenza vaccines since 2009, pointed out decreasing antibody but not memory B-cell responses for HIV-1 infected patients being vaccinated for a greater number of years. Further investigations are required to standardize the influenza-specific B-cell ELISpot and to understand whether it could be used routinely as an additional tool to evaluate response to influenza vaccination in immune-compromised individuals being vaccinated yearly.

KEYWORDS:

AIDS; B-cell ELISpot; B-cells; ELISpot; HI; Immune-compromised; Seasonal influenza; Vaccination response; enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot; hemagglutination inhibition

PMID:
24333344
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.12.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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