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Maturitas. 2014 Mar;77(3):249-54. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2013.11.003. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Influence of number of deliveries and total breast-feeding time on bone mineral density in premenopausal and young postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Institute of Endocrinology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: Gloria.tsvetov@gmail.com.
2
Statistical Education Unit, The Academic College of Tel Aviv Yaffo, Israel.
3
Institute of Endocrinology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Pregnancy and lactation have been associated with decline in bone mineral density (BMD). It is not clear if there is a full recovery of BMD to baseline. This study sought to determine if pregnancy or breast-feeding or both have a cumulative effect on BMD in premenopausal and early postmenopausal women.

STUDY DESIGN:

We performed single-center cohort analysis. Five hundred women aged 35-55 years underwent routine BMD screening from February to July 2011 at a tertiary medical center. Patients were questioned about number of total full-term deliveries and duration of breast-feeding and completed a background questionnaire on menarche and menopause, smoking, dairy product consumption, and weekly physical exercise. Weight and height were measured. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure spinal, dual femoral neck, and total hip BMD.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Associations between background characteristics and BMD values were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Sixty percent of the women were premenopausal. Mean number of deliveries was 2.5 and mean duration of breast-feeding was 9.12 months. On univariate analysis, BMD values were negatively correlated with patient age (p=0.006) and number of births (p=0.013), and positively correlated with body mass index (p<0.001). On multiple (adjusted) logistic regression analysis, prolonged breast-feeding duration, but not number of deliveries, was significantly correlated to a low BMD (p=0.008). An effect was noted only in postmenopausal women. The spine was the most common site of BMD decrease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prolonged breast-feeding may have a deleterious long-term effect on BMD and may contribute to increased risk of osteoporosis later in life.

KEYWORDS:

Bone density; Breast-feeding; Osteoporosis; Pregnancy; Risk factors

PMID:
24332872
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2013.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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