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J Relig Health. 2014 Apr;53(2):614-29. doi: 10.1007/s10943-013-9805-z.

The human dark side: evolutionary psychology and original sin.

Author information

1
Department of Theology, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5032, Australia, joseph.lee@flinders.edu.au.

Erratum in

  • J Relig Health. 2014 Apr;53(2):630. Theol, M [removed].

Abstract

Human nature has a dark side, something important to religions. Evolutionary psychology has been used to illuminate the human shadow side, although as a discipline it has attracted criticism. This article seeks to examine the evolutionary psychology's understanding of human nature and to propose an unexpected dialog with an enduring account of human evil known as original sin. Two cases are briefly considered: murder and rape. To further the exchange, numerous theoretical and methodological criticisms and replies of evolutionary psychology are explored jointly with original sin. Evolutionary psychology can partner with original sin since they share some theoretical likenesses and together they offer insights into the nature of what it means to be human.

PMID:
24327261
DOI:
10.1007/s10943-013-9805-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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