Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. 2013 Dec;12(6):607-16.

Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for focal liver lesions in Chinese patients: a multicenter, open-label, phase III study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. zeng.mengsu@zs-hospital.sh.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Contrast agents help to improve visibility in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, owing to the large interstitial spaces of the liver, there is a reduction in the natural contrast gradient between lesions and healthy tissue. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the liver-specific MR imaging contrast agent gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in Chinese patients.

METHODS:

This was a single-arm, open-label, multicenter study in patients with known or suspected focal liver lesions referred for contrast-enhanced MR imaging. MR imaging was performed in 234 patients before and after a single intravenous bolus of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg body weight). Images were evaluated by clinical study investigators and three independent, blinded radiologists. The primary efficacy endpoint was sensitivity in lesion detection.

RESULTS:

Gd-EOB-DTPA improved sensitivity in lesion detection by 9.46% compared with pre-contrast imaging for the average of the three blinded readers (94.78% vs 85.32% for Gd-EOB-DTPA vs pre-contrast, respectively). Improvements in detection were more pronounced in lesions less than 1 cm. Gd-EOB-DTPA improved diagnostic accuracy in lesion classification.

CONCLUSIONS:

This open-label study demonstrated that Gd-EOB-DTPA improves diagnostic sensitivity in liver lesions, particularly in those smaller than 1 cm. Gd-EOB-DTPA also significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy in lesion classification, and furthermore, Gd-EOB-DTPA is safe in Chinese patients with liver lesions.

PMID:
24322746
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine
    Loading ...
    Support Center