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Stem Cell Reports. 2013 Sep 26;1(4):283-92. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2013.08.007. eCollection 2013.

Direct comparison of autologous and allogeneic transplantation of iPSC-derived neural cells in the brain of a non-human primate.

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1
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide the potential for autologous transplantation using cells derived from a patient's own cells. However, the immunogenicity of iPSCs or their derivatives has been a matter of controversy, and up to now there has been no direct comparison of autologous and allogeneic transplantation in the brains of humans or nonhuman primates. Here, using nonhuman primates, we found that the autologous transplantation of iPSC-derived neurons elicited only a minimal immune response in the brain. In contrast, the allografts caused an acquired immune response with the activation of microglia (IBA-1(+)/MHC class II(+)) and the infiltration of leukocytes (CD45(+)/CD3(+)). Consequently, a higher number of dopaminergic neurons survived in the autografts. Our results suggest that the autologous transplantation of iPSC-derived neural cells is advantageous for minimizing the immune response in the brain compared with allogeneic grafts.

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PMID:
24319664
PMCID:
PMC3849265
DOI:
10.1016/j.stemcr.2013.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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