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Neurochem Res. 2014 Jan;39(1):216-24. doi: 10.1007/s11064-013-1212-z. Epub 2013 Dec 7.

Probenecid protects against transient focal cerebral ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1 release and attenuating AQP4 expression in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesia, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Abstract

Stroke results in inflammation, brain edema, and neuronal death. However, effective neuroprotectants are not available. Recent studies have shown that high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a proinflammatory cytokine, contributes to ischemic brain injury. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, is considered to play a pivotal role in ischemia-induced brain edema. More recently, studies have shown that pannexin 1 channels are involved in cerebral ischemic injury and the cellular inflammatory response. Here, we examined whether the pannexin 1 channel inhibitor probenecid could reduce focal ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema. Transient focal ischemia was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h. Infarct volume, neurological score and cerebral water content were evaluated 48 h after MCAO. Immunostaining, western blot analysis and ELISA were used to assess the effects of probenecid on the cellular inflammatory response, HMGB1 release and AQP4 expression. Administration of probenecid reduced infarct size, decreased cerebral water content, inhibited neuronal death, and reduced inflammation in the brain 48 h after stroke. In addition, HMGB1 release from neurons was significantly diminished and serum HMGB1 levels were substantially reduced following probenecid treatment. Moreover, AQP4 protein expression was downregulated in the cortical penumbra following post-stroke treatment with probenecid. These results suggest that probenecid, a powerful pannexin 1 channel inhibitor, protects against ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema.

PMID:
24317635
DOI:
10.1007/s11064-013-1212-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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