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Sci Total Environ. 2014 Feb 15;472:502-8. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.11.090. Epub 2013 Dec 6.

Dynamics of communities of bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in response to simazine attenuation in agricultural soil.

Author information

1
College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.
2
College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. Electronic address: xiesg@pku.edu.cn.

Abstract

Autochthonous microbiota plays a crucial role in natural attenuation of s-triazine herbicides in agricultural soil. Soil microcosm study was carried out to investigate the shift in the structures of soil autochthonous microbial communities and the potential degraders associated with natural simazine attenuation. The relative abundance of soil autochthonous degraders and the structures of microbial communities were assessed using quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), respectively. Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community was also characterized using clone library analysis. Soil autochthonous microbiota could almost completely clean up simazine (100 mg kg(-1)) in 10 days after herbicide application, indicating a strong self-remediation potential of agricultural soil. A significant increase in the proportion of s-triazine-degrading atzC gene was found in 6 days after simazine amendment. Simazine application could alter the community structures of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). AOA were more responsive to simazine application compared to AOB and bacteria. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial groups either at the initial stage after simazine amendment or at the end stage of herbicide biodegradation, but Actinobacteria predominated at the middle stage of biodegradation. Microorganisms from several bacterial genera might be involved in simazine biodegradation. This work could add some new insights on the bioremediation of herbicides contaminated agricultural soils.

KEYWORDS:

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA); Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB); Arthrobacter; Biodegradation; Microbial community; s-triazine herbicides

PMID:
24317158
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.11.090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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