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Environ Pollut. 2014 Feb;185:333-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2013.10.016. Epub 2013 Dec 5.

Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in different tissues (liver, intestines, gills, and muscles) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: method characterization.

Author information

1
Unité de Caractérisation des Toxines, ANSES, 23 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94706 Maisons-Alfort, France. Electronic address: sabrina.cadelsix@anses.fr.
2
UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN Molécules de Communication et Adaptation des Micro-organismes, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.
3
Unité de Caractérisation des Toxines, ANSES, 23 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94706 Maisons-Alfort, France.

Abstract

So far only a few publications have explored the development of extraction methods of cyanotoxin extracted from complex matrices. With regard to cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs), the data on the contamination of the flesh of aquatic organisms is hard to compare and very limited due to the lack of validated methods. In recent years, evidence that both free and bound fractions of toxin are found in these tissues has highlighted the need to develop effective methods of quantification. Several techniques do exist, but only the Lemieux oxidation has so far been used to investigate complex tissue matrices. In this study, protocols based on the Lemieux approach were adapted for the quantitative chemical analysis of free MC-LR and MMPB derived from bound toxin in the tissues of juvenile trout gavaged with MC-LR. Afterwards, the NF V03 110 guideline was used to characterize the protocols elaborated and evaluate their effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Complex matrices; Free and covalently bound microcystins; LC/MS–MS; Lemieux oxidation; NF V03 110 guideline

PMID:
24316797
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2013.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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