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Clin Dermatol. 2014 Jan-Feb;32(1):131-40. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2013.05.035.

Periorbital (eyelid) dermatides.

Author information

1
Dermatology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel; School of Medicine, Hebrew University and Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: wolf_r@netvision.net.il.

Abstract

Physicians in various specialties-and dermatologists in particular-frequently encounter various forms of inflammation of the eyelids and of the anterior surface of the eye. Distinguishing the cause of itchy, painful, red, edematous eyelids is often difficult. Because the uppermost layer of the eyelids is part of the skin that wraps the entire body, almost every skin disease in the textbook can affect the periorbital area as well. In this contribution, we focused on the most common such disorders that require special consideration, as a result of their special appearance, their challenging diagnosis, or the nature of their treatment. We reviewed the key features of several common dermatides that affect the eyelids, such as atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, airborne contact dermatitis, rosacea, psoriasis, and others. We focused on the special clinical features, causes, and treatments specific to the delicate skin of the eyelids. Because structures of the eye itself (i.e., the conjunctiva, the cornea, the lens, and the retina) may be involved in some of the discussed periorbital skin diseases, we found it useful to add a brief summary of the eyelid complications of those diseases. We then briefly reviewed some acute sight-threatening and even life-threatening infections of the eyelids, although dermatologists are not likely to be the primary care physicians responsible for treating them.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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