Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Jul;22(7):1694-700. doi: 10.1002/oby.20652. Epub 2013 Dec 6.

Pass the popcorn: "obesogenic" behaviors and stigma in children's movies.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of obesity-related behaviors and attitudes in children's movies.

METHODS:

A mixed-methods study of the top-grossing G- and PG-rated movies, 2006-2010 (4 per year) was performed. For each 10-min movie segment, the following were assessed: 1) prevalence of key nutrition and physical activity behaviors corresponding to the American Academy of Pediatrics obesity prevention recommendations for families; 2) prevalence of weight stigma; 3) assessment as healthy, unhealthy, or neutral; 3) free-text interpretations of stigma.

RESULTS:

Agreement between coders was >85% (Cohen's kappa = 0.7), good for binary responses. Segments with food depicted: exaggerated portion size (26%); unhealthy snacks (51%); sugar-sweetened beverages (19%). Screen time was also prevalent (40% of movies showed television; 35% computer; 20% video games). Unhealthy segments outnumbered healthy segments 2:1. Most (70%) of the movies included weight-related stigmatizing content (e.g., "That fat butt! Flabby arms! And this ridiculous belly!").

CONCLUSIONS:

These popular children's movies had significant "obesogenic" content, and most contained weight-based stigma. They present a mixed message to children, promoting unhealthy behaviors while stigmatizing the behaviors' possible effects. Further research is needed to determine the effects of such messages on children.

PMID:
24311390
PMCID:
PMC4004726
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20652
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center