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Clin Oral Investig. 2014 Sep;18(7):1771-8. doi: 10.1007/s00784-013-1155-4. Epub 2013 Dec 6.

Radiotherapy does not impair dentin adhesive properties in head and neck cancer patients.

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1
Department of Restorative Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Limeira Avenue, 901-Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil, 13414-903, 52.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study evaluated the influence of radiotherapy on the dentin bond strength of teeth extracted from patients who had undergone head and neck radiotherapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 36 samples were divided into two experimental groups: group I (control group, n = 18) and group II (in vivo irradiated group, n = 18). Groups I and II were further separated into three subgroups (six specimens per subgroup), which were further assigned to the three adhesive system protocols employed: Single Bond 2 (SB) (3M ESPE), Easy Bond (EB) (3M ESPE) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray). The adhesive systems were applied to the prepared surface according to the manufacturers' instructions and restored using composite resin (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE). After 24 h in deionised water (37(o)C), teeth were horizontally and vertically cut to obtain beam specimens with a cross-section area of 0.8 ± 1.0 mm(2). Specimens were tested in tension using a universal testing machine at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture patterns were observed under SEM. Data was analysed by two-way analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05).

RESULTS:

No statistically significant difference was found between the irradiated (R/SB = 44.66 ± 10.12 MPa; R/EB = 41.48 ± 12.71 MPa; and R/CSE = 46.01 ± 6.98 MPa) and control group (C/SB = 39.12 ± 9.51 MPa; C/EB = 42.40 ± 6.66 MPa; and C/CSE = 36.58 ± 7.06 MPa) for any of the adhesive systems. All groups presented a predominance of mixed fracture modes.

CONCLUSION:

Head and neck radiotherapy did not affect dentin bond strength for the adhesive materials tested in this study.

PMID:
24309632
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-013-1155-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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