Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Korean J Intern Med. 2013 Nov;28(6):687-93. doi: 10.3904/kjim.2013.28.6.687. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Clinicopathological characteristics of synchronous and metachronous gastric neoplasms after endoscopic submucosal dissection.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become accepted as a minimally invasive treatment for gastric neoplasms. However, the development of synchronous or metachronous gastric lesions after endoscopic resection has become a major problem. We investigated the characteristics of multiple gastric neoplasms in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC) or gastric adenoma after ESD.

METHODS:

In total, 512 patients with EGC or gastric adenoma who had undergone ESD between January 2008 and December 2011 participated in this study. The incidence of and factors associated with synchronous and metachronous gastric tumors were investigated in this retrospective study.

RESULTS:

In total, 66 patients (12.9%) had synchronous lesions, and 13 patients (2.5%) had metachronous lesions. Older (> 65 years) subjects had an increased risk of multiple gastric neoplasms (p = 0.012). About two-thirds of the multiple lesions were similar in macroscopic and histological type to the primary lesions. The median interval from the initial lesions to the diagnosis of metachronous lesions was 31 months. The annual incidence rate of metachronous lesions was approximately 3%.

CONCLUSIONS:

We recommend careful follow-up in patients of advanced age (> 65 years) after initial ESD because multiple lesions could be detected in the remnant stomach. Annual surveillance might aid in the detection of metachronous lesions. Large-scale, multicenter, and longer prospective studies of appropriate surveillance programs are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Neoplasms, multiple primary; Neoplasms, second primary; Stomach neoplasms

PMID:
24307844
PMCID:
PMC3846994
DOI:
10.3904/kjim.2013.28.6.687
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Publishing M2Community Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center