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Purinergic Signal. 2014 Mar;10(1):3-50. doi: 10.1007/s11302-013-9397-9. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

Purinergic signalling in the gastrointestinal tract and related organs in health and disease.

Author information

1
Autonomic Neuroscience Centre, University College Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK, g.burnstock@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Purinergic signalling plays major roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of digestive organs. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), together with nitric oxide and vasoactive intestinal peptide, is a cotransmitter in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory neuromuscular transmission. P2X and P2Y receptors are widely expressed in myenteric and submucous enteric plexuses and participate in sympathetic transmission and neuromodulation involved in enteric reflex activities, as well as influencing gastric and intestinal epithelial secretion and vascular activities. Involvement of purinergic signalling has been identified in a variety of diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, ischaemia, diabetes and cancer. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction forms the basis of enteric nociception, where ATP released from mucosal epithelial cells by distension activates nociceptive subepithelial primary afferent sensory fibres expressing P2X3 receptors to send messages to the pain centres in the central nervous system via interneurons in the spinal cord. Purinergic signalling is also involved in salivary gland and bile duct secretion.

PMID:
24307520
PMCID:
PMC3944042
DOI:
10.1007/s11302-013-9397-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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