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Rev Invest Clin. 2013 Jul-Aug;65(4):291-9.

Nutritional care, time period since diagnosis, demographics and body mass index in HIV/AIDS patients.

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1
Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, FASPyN. Monterrey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nutritional status and nutritional care have long been ignored among HIV/AIDS patients. Furthermore, in Mexico there is no information on potential factors favoring weight increase in such population.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association between the time period since diagnosis, demographics and BMI in different categories of patients with HIV/AIDS in Monterrey, Mexico. In addition, to provide information on overweight/obesity prevalence and nutritional care referral.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

This was a cross-sectional study of HIV/AIDS positive patients receiving outpatient secondary care (n = 231). Nutritional care referral, time period since diagnosis and demographic data were obtained by interview. A standardized and registered dietitian collected anthropometrics measures. Binary multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between increasing BMI categories and variables of interest.

RESULTS:

Mean patient age was 40.6 ± 11.2 years, 87% were male, 79.2% were economically active, 65% were single and 60% had less than a college education. The average time since diagnosis was 6.5 ± 5.4 years. Overweight and obesity prevalence were 35.8% and 12.5%, respectively. Only 18% of patients had ever been referred for nutritional care. The time period since diagnosis, the sum of skinfold measurements and the waist-to-hip ratio, were significantly predictive of the BMI category (normal/underweight vs. overweight/obese), when controlling for nutritional care referral and daily carbohydrate intake; age and marital status were not associated with BMI category.

CONCLUSIONS:

Identification of predisposing factors to overweight/obesity among HIV/AIDS patients constitutes a significant step for providing nutritional care, of the same importance as the load or CD4+ count, especially nowadays, with more common increased survival rates and consequently, longer lives with the disease.

PMID:
24304729
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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